Debate may have been a tie, but post debate? Not close

This article by Mary Hemingway details an important aspect about the debate that Biden may have really damaged himself with: the post debate.

 

AEI word cloud analysis: Obama vs. Romney

As we’ve become accustomed too, the American Enterprise Institute have issued an interesting tid-bit from the debate: Romney and Obama’s word clouds. Look through them and see if anything stands out to you:

Romney word cloud

Obama word cloud

First Debate: Obama’s “emperor has no clothes” moment

Joe Scarborough and the gang from “Morning Joe” discussed the debate.

“More than polls, because polls do move around; I’m interested in the people that come up to me in the street and my Democratic friends and what they’re saying to me. And I won’t say that there is a sense of panic, but there has been a real emperor has no clothes moment over the past week and it keeps growing by the day. That’s why I’m bringing this up. I know that everyone that’s watching is hearing this in their own hometowns as well, it’s stunning now,” Joe Scarborough said on the Monday broadcast of his MSNBC show “Morning Joe.”

What the debate did – Right Turn – The Washington Post

What the debate did – Right Turn – The Washington Post.

Jennifer Rubin argues that 8 indicators from the Romney/Obama debate last week show that perhaps Romney should be considered a favorite at this point.  Looking through her list, the one that stands out to me the most is the “inevitability” point:

The polls have moved substantially, thereby blowing up the notion that Obama had this in the bag. Gallup tells us: “Registered voters’ preferences for president are evenly split in the first three days of Gallup tracking since last Wednesday’s presidential debate. In the three days prior to the debate, Barack Obama had a five-percentage-point edge among registered voters.”

 

 

Anatomy of a Disastrous Debate Performance

Works and Days » Anatomy of a Disastrous Debate Performance.

Obama’s real preferences are instead for brief puff appearances on favorable, celebrity TV and radio showsthat tend to enfeeble rather than sharpen his own analysis. And even those are rare, given his propensity to offer gaffes (in this regard, the “you didn’t build that” and “the private sector is doing fine” sort are as frequent as or more common than the far more notorious fare from Joe Biden). In such an attenuated career, we forget that Obama’s prior debate appearances have been rare, and against undistinguished debaters in group fashion during the Democratic primary and John McCain, and, in fact, were themselves largely just workmanlike and just enough to get by. His real and only political interests (and skills) are in caricaturing opponents, in a sort of trash-talking sports fashion (“you’re likeable enough, Hilary,” “fat-cat banker,” “corporate jet owner,” the limb-lopping, tonsil-pulling physicians, etc.) or in whipping up a crowd (“get in their faces,” “gun to a knife fight,” “punish our enemies,” etc.)

Yet perhaps the reason for Obama’s reluctance to face questions and counter-argument was not just that Obama is not very good at it and resents doing his homework (“a drag”), and not just that his economic and foreign policy records are dismal and would be hard to defend under scrutiny, but largely that he has had scant need to work on debating or sharpening his analytical skills — given the investment of the media and popular culture in his success.